Raidió Rí Rá

Raidió Rí Rá roars onto our airwaves

A new temporarily-licensed hit music station broadcasting in Irish was launched today by Minister of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Eamon Ó’Cuiv (pictured below, being interviewed on air this morning).

A new temporarily-licensed hit music station broadcasting in Irish was launched today by Minister of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Eamon Ó’Cuiv (pictured below, being interviewed on air this morning).

 Raidió Rí Rá is on air in four cities from the former studios of Dublin’s 98 on Upper Mount Street. It is available on 100.3MHz FM in Dublin, 106.7MHz FM in Cork, 105.5MHz FM in Limerick and 99.1MHz FM in Galway. The station will run for three weeks in conjunction with Seachtain na Gaeilge.

Raidió Rí Rá is operated by Dusty Rhodes’ company Digital Audio Productions, which operates a number of digital radio stations. DAP specialise in syndicated radio programmes, podcasting, radio commercials. Their All 80s and Mocha R’n’B radio stations were part of the recent DAB & DTT trials and expect to be back on DAB before the summer.

A new temporarily-licensed hit music station broadcasting in Irish was launched today by Minister of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Eamon Ó’Cuiv (pictured below, being interviewed on air this morning).
Sean Ó’hAdhmaill (Presenter) with Minister O’Cuiv and Linda Nolan (Samsung – station sponsor)

Rhodes says: “Digital radio is very niche-focused which is great for advertisers. You can identify a highly-targeted audience which leads to much better penetration and high value ROI. Digital radio can be heard right now online and on digital cable systems with usage increasing every year in Ireland. In the coming months it will branch out on to DAB and DTT. There are two key advantages to digital radio. The first is an increased choice of new stations for listeners, the second is additional information and advertising opportunities on screens common to all the new platforms. Digital radio delivers a multimedia radio experience to listeners with relevant on-screen information to accompany the station’s audio. When compared to phones, iPods, TVs, laptops and so on, the lack of data on FM makes it very much a twentieth century technology.”

Rhodes thinks Raidió Rí Rá will be their one and only foray into FM broadcasting. He said: “With radio we’re only interested in moving forward. FM may be king for now but long term it’s going to become the AM band of the new millennium. All the indications are that in the next 10 to 15 years digital will be the predominant medium across Ireland, Europe, Asia and Australia.”

Raidió Rí Rá is also available all year round on raidiorira.ie


Metro – March 3rd 2009

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